Summary

The aim of the IMI Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Accelerator is to progress the development of new medicines to treat or even prevent resistant bacterial infections in Europe and worldwide. The programme comprises three pillars: a Capability Building Network, a Tuberculosis Drug Development Network; and Portfolio Building Networks. The scope of the AMR Accelerator is broad; under one structure, it addresses many of the scientific challenges of AMR, and it supports the development of new ways to prevent and treat AMR. More broadly, the IMI AMR Accelerator contributes to the European action plan on AMR.

AMR – a global public health emergency

Antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. In Europe alone, AMR kills an estimated 33 000 people annually. Globally, it kills 700 000 every year and that figure is set to rise to 10 million by 2050. There is therefore an urgent need for new medicines to prevent and treat resistant infections. In its 2017 action plan on AMR, the European Commission includes a chapter dedicated to boosting research, development and innovation which cites IMI as one of the tools to be used to address AMR.

Introducing the IMI AMR Accelerator

IMI launched the AMR Accelerator in 2018 as part of IMI2 – Calls 15 and 16. The goal of the programme is to progress the development of new medicines to treat or even prevent resistant bacterial infections in Europe and worldwide. The programme has three pillars: a Capability Building Network, a Tuberculosis Drug Development Network; and Portfolio Building Networks. The scope of the AMR Accelerator is broad; under one structure, it addresses many of the scientific challenges of AMR, and it supports the development of new ways to prevent and treat AMR (including new antibiotics).

Within this broad scope, projects in the AMR Accelerator will develop new pre-clinical tools and methods, validate alternative or ‘non-traditional’ approaches, progress potential new treatments through phase 1-3 clinical trials, and analyse data from EFPIA-funded clinical trials to assist in the translation of preclinical data to clinical results of novel anti-infective agents. As such, the AMR Accelerator complements and builds on the achievements of IMI’s New Drugs for Bad Bugs programme, which also focuses on AMR.

Pillar A: Capability Building Network (CBN) to accelerate and validate scientific discoveries

The Capability Building Network will coordinate the programme and carry out research to strengthen the scientific basis in the AMR field. IMI2 – Call 15 included one topic in this area; the resulting project is currently being finalised and is expected to be launched in late 2019. The goals of this project will be to implement a coordination and support group that will support operations of all projects in the AMR Accelerator with effective management, communication, and data capture capabilities. It will also focus on the collection, sharing, and analysis of vaccine and/or antibacterial clinical trial data and the optimisation of animal infection models for bacterial infections.

Pillar B: Tuberculosis Drug Development Network (TBDDN) to accelerate and validate scientific discoveries and advance the R&D pipeline of new and innovative agents to address the global TB epidemic

As its name suggests, the Tuberculosis Drug Development Network will work to accelerate the discovery of new combinations of drugs to treat TB. IMI2 – Call 15 included one topic in this area; the resulting project is currently being finalised and is expected to be launched in late 2019. The goals of this project will be to profile and progress anti-TB compounds from advanced lead through phase 1 and to collect, share, and analyse TB clinical trial data. Additionally, it will address the development of new alternative anti-tubercular drugs (for example, host-defence or virulence approaches).

Pillar C: Portfolio Building Networks (PBN) to advance the R&D pipeline of new and innovative agents to address AMR

The Portfolio Building Networks support collaborative efforts to discover, develop and advance new and innovative agents to prevent or treat AMR. PBNs provide a mechanism for dedicated partnerships between EFPIA companies and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and/or academic teams for the discovery and development of new antibacterial assets. Assets and projects can originate from SMEs, academia, or EFPIA companies, and will be jointly progressed or studied, including both pre-clinical work and potentially phase 1-3 clinical development. The first projects under this pillar were launched in spring 2019.

  • AB-DIRECT | Antibiotic distribution and recovery in tissue
  • GNA NOW | Novel Gram-negative antibiotic now
  • RespiriNTM | Progress novel assets (one FIH [first in human] start) for non-tubercular mycobacteria that may act synergistically with bedaquiline and cytochrome bc drugs
  • RespiriTB | Progress new assets (one pre-new molecular entity and one first-time-in-human start) for tuberculosis that act synergistically with bedaquiline, cytochrome bc or cytochrome bd inhibitors
  • TRIC-TB | Boosting ethionamide efficacy and lowering the dose with a small molecule transcriptional modulators, to overcoming MDR-TB [multi-drug resistant tuberculosis] infections and define a new place for ethionamide in 1st-line TB treatments

Achievements & News

Coming up in November: Focus on antimicrobial resistance
October 2019

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is becoming one of the defining problems of our time. As bacteria become resistant to the drugs that are supposed to kill them, scientists, policy makers and the pharmaceutical industry are looking at different ways to fix the problem before it’s too late. IMI has invested heavily in AMR research.### In November, we will be taking a look at some IMI projects and the different angles from which they’re tackling the problem – from rapid diagnostics and public health policy, to permeability and prophylactic vaccines.

We’ll be publishing new stories throughout November in our newsroom; follow @IMI_JU on Twitter for updates. We will also publish links to all the AMR articles in the next edition of the newsletter.

Find out more about IMI’s AMR projects:

Participants

Details of all project participants can be found on the individual project factsheets.

CONTACT

Contact details for the projects can be found in the individual project factsheets.